(Source: glamour)

Sup.

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/160th
  4. Focal Length: 55mm
  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix X100
  2. Aperture: f/5.6
  3. Exposure: 1/40th
  4. Focal Length: 23mm

Best headline

emilyblincoe:

never

//don’t die

january 2014

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/4.5
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 40mm

Hanging around after Creative Mornings

photo by Tim Lampe

  1. Camera: iPhone 5
  2. Aperture: f/2.4
  3. Exposure: 1/638th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm
Album Art

I don’t want to live, I don’t want to die without you But you asked me what it is I must do

Finally getting around to buying and listening to Valley Maker’s latest album, Yes I know I’ve Loved This World

Give it a listen

Played 29 times.

Mansions - Climbers live on Audiotree

Check out their new album, Doom Loop here

Yes there are things that I’m still so afraid of, but my courage is roaring like the sound of the sun

(Source: Spotify)

This was my mom’s favorite song when I was a kid

(Source: Spotify)

(Source: Spotify)

nprfreshair:



TODAY is the 50th Anniversary of the beloved classic Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.  First published in 1963, it has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.
The New York Times obituary for Maurice Sendak calls Where the Wild Things Are “simultaneously genre-breaking and career-making,” describing Sendak as being “…widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century, who wrenched the picture book out of the safe, sanitized world of the nursery and plunged it into the dark, terrifying and hauntingly beautiful recesses of the human psyche.”

One of the most talked about interviews we’ve ever done was with Maurice Sendak in 2011 shortly before he died. Sendak reflects on love, loss, and celebrating life: 

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.

And if you haven’t seen it yet, The New York Times did an amazing illustration to accompany our emotional interview with Sendak. 

nprfreshair:

TODAY is the 50th Anniversary of the beloved classic Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.  First published in 1963, it has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.

The New York Times obituary for Maurice Sendak calls Where the Wild Things Are “simultaneously genre-breaking and career-making,” describing Sendak as being “…widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century, who wrenched the picture book out of the safe, sanitized world of the nursery and plunged it into the dark, terrifying and hauntingly beautiful recesses of the human psyche.”

One of the most talked about interviews we’ve ever done was with Maurice Sendak in 2011 shortly before he died. Sendak reflects on love, loss, and celebrating life:

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.

And if you haven’t seen it yet, The New York Times did an amazing illustration to accompany our emotional interview with Sendak.